When I Invented Silent Gigs / Discos

Have a look at this interview from March 1997:

(Source: New York Times)

If you look up Silent Disco on Wikipedia, you get this:

In May 2002 artist Meg Duguid hosted Dance with me… a silent dance party at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago where she created an outdoor club installation complete with velvet ropes and glow rope in which a DJ spun a transmission to wireless headsets that audience members put on and danced to.[4][5][6] Duguid threw a second dance party at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago the following year, entitled Dueling DJs where two DJS simultaneously spun two separate musical transmissions various wireless headsets that audience members put on and danced to. This performance was repeated the following year (2004) at the Chicago Cultural Center.[7]

The term “silent disco” has been in existence since at least 2005 with Bonnaroo Music Festival advertising such an event that year with DJ’s Motion Potion, Quickie Mart and DJ medi4 and headphones provided by KOSS.[8] In recent years Silent Events has presented Bonaroo’s Silent Disco.[9]

In the Netherlands, the traveling arts and culture festival De Parade already featured a “stille disco” [silent disco] earlier, for example in 2003.[10] Dutch DJs Nico Okkerse and Michael Minton have been described as “the pioneers … in the legend of silent disco” because they started “stille disco” events in 2002.[11] Okkerse claims his company 433fm.com “created Silent Disco in 2002”[12] and its site does have photos from such events going back to at least 2003.[13]

(Source: Wikipedia)

So, yaay, that was five years after when I invented it, depending which one you believe.

But then…

A silent concert (or headphones concert) is a live music performance where the audience, in the same venue as the performing artist, listens to the music through headphones.[20] The idea originated in 1997 when Erik Minkkinen,[21][22] an electronic artist[23][24] from Paris, streamed a live concert from his closet over the internet to three listeners in Japan.[25] The concept led to a decentralized organization known as le placard (“the Cupboard”),[26] which allowed anybody to establish a streaming or listening room.[25]

The first headphone concert taking place in front of a live audience took place March 17, 1999, at Trees in Dallas, Texas. The American psychedelic band The Flaming Lips used an FM signal generator at the venue and handed out mini FM radio receivers and headphones to each member of the audience. A normal speaker system was also used so the sound could also be felt. This continued on their “International Music Against Brain Degeneration Revue” tour with mixed results, with technical problems including dead batteries and intoxicated audience members having trouble tuning to the correct frequency.[27]

(Source: Wikipedia)

So, depending on when in ’97 Minkkinen did his proto-Twitch stream, maybe I’m a co-inventor. But Flaming Lips, March???

Highly suspicious…